Fun Facts and Inspiration for October 14


via Fun Facts and Inspiration for October 14

USAA To End the Real Estate Portion of their Business


USAA To End the Real Estate Portion of their Business

USAA has just announced that they will discontinue the real estate portion of the USAA business model.

Those buyers or sellers who are already actively buying or selling with USAA will continue as planned. Military active personnel or veterans who are considering real estate should contact a broker, such as Coldwell Banker, to sign on to a new program through CARTUS that specializes in military clients.  The ending of USAA Real Estate Network does not affect NFCU referrals.

I encourage potential clients to contact a REALTOR® to discuss the various options, such as a mortgage broker for buyers and listing commissions for sellers.

If you are thinking of buying or selling, talk to a real estate professional – talk to a REALTOR® who can give you the information you need to make an informed decision.

As always, if I can help with any of your real estate needs, please feel free to text or call me at 301-712-8808 or email me at RolandLow1@gmail.com.

Roland

PLEASE VISIT AND SHARE MY BLOGS AT
WWW.ROLANDLOW.WORDPRESS.COM
WWW.ALWAYSWANTEDTOKNOW.WORDPRESS.COM
WWW.SPIRITUALCHALLENGES.WORDPRESS.COM

What in The World is Going On in The World of Real Estate??


What in The World is Going On in The World of Real Estate??

 The real estate market in Maryland and throughout the nation has “tanked” so far in 2019 and the reason for the dilemma may be more serious that most people realize.

The number of units sold in Maryland has declined every month in 2019 compared to 2018. The decline in the number of units sold have ranged from a decrease of 1.8% in May 2019 to a decrease of 16.8% in January 2019.

Frederick County has also had a decrease in the number of units sold every month in 2019.  Washington county has had a decline of 3 months but an increase in 3 months.

Typically, when buyers remain on the sidelines, home prices fall in response to lower demand, but this is not the case in 2019.  In Maryland this year, the average sale price of homes has increased every month this year except for March of this year when the average home price declined 0.1% – a reduction of $305 off the average price.

Mortgage interest rates have remained low and should be a good incentive for first-time homebuyers’; unemployment is low; and mortgage companies are vying for business, yet the real estate market has been stagnant for the last four years.

Although mortgages have become cheaper, the cost of homes has not.  The Standard and Poor’s / Case-Shiller US National Home Price Index shows that home prices have climbed steadily over the past seven years.  Since 2012, home prices have increased about three times the pace of wages.  This then is the problem that is negatively impacting the real estate market. According to Chris Rupkey, chief financial economist of MUFG, “Homes are going to move out of the range of many buyers in terms of affordability, and maybe that is what we are seeing already.”

 Lawrence Yun, chief economist at the National Association of REALTORS®,  stated “Either a strong pent-up demand (for homes) will show in the upcoming months, or there is a lack of confidence that is keeping buyers from major expenditures.”

If you are thinking of buying or selling, talk to a real estate professional – talk to a REALTOR® who can give you the information you need to make an informed decision.

As always, if I can help with any of your real estate needs, please feel free to text or call me at 301-712-8808 or email me at RolandLow1@gmail.com.

Roland

 

PLEASE VISIT AND SHARE MY BLOGS AT

WWW.ROLANDLOW.WORDPRESS.COM

WWW.ALWAYSWANTEDTOKNOW.WORDPRESS.COM

WWW.SPIRITUALCHALLENGES.WORDPRESS.COM

 

 

 

 

 

One of the driving forces to a strong economy is the housing market.  When people buy a home, they undoubtedly buy those necessities that go along with home ownership, such as a lawn mower, furniture, washer and dryer, window treatments and on and on.

Steps You Can Take to Be a Good Neighbor


Steps You Can Take to Be a Good Neighbor

Whether you rent a city apartment or own a family home in the countryside, live miles away from your nearest neighbor or are situated close enough to chat from your own back patio—you can make small changes in your community every day by quite simply just acting in a neighborly way.

The importance of being a good neighbor extends far beyond improving bonds with those you live closest to. In fact, Harvard professor and author Robert D. Putnam says, “Communities work better (students perform better, crime rates are lower, kids are safer, people live longer) when neighbors know one another better. Knowing your neighbors on a first-name basis, as National Neighborhood Day suggests, is a surprisingly effective first step toward a better America.”

So, to help inspire the practice of neighborly ways in your own community, here is a list of top things good neighbors do.

Take the time to establish good terms and build relationships with all neighbors.

Great neighbors make their communities friendlier and safer, while improving the overall quality of life for themselves and those who surround them.

Pay it forward.
Every time a neighbor does something nice, he or she pays it forward to at least two other neighbors. Even simple things—like clearing a neighbor’s driveway before he or she gets the chance to, offering up a piece of lawn equipment to save a neighbor valuable time, or bringing along an extra latte on your morning walk to work—can have a huge impact on a neighborly relationship.

Do your part.
Keeping the neighborhood looking beautiful is a community effort, and good neighbors keep all spaces that are visible by others clean and well maintained. They keep up with basic yard work, making sure that the lawn is mowed, hedges are trimmed, and weeds are kept at bay; they understand that these tasks not only impact the value of their house, but also the homes around it.

Follow up with seasonal maintenance.
This includes sweeping up leaves in the fall, shoveling sidewalks and driveways in the winter, and cleaning up lawn clippings during warmer months. The neighbors that brighten up their outdoor space with flowers and other landscaping set the precedent for the rest of the street.

Be tidy.
Good neighbors take care to put their trash out on the right night, and in proper receptacles, so that the whole street doesn’t see (or smell) what they’ve tossed.

Be conscientious about outdoor decor.
Decorating for the holidays is a great way to spruce up an outdoor space, but make it a house rule that your haunted houses and lights come down within a few weeks of the holiday passing.

Don’t fight for the right to party.
When having additional people over, the noise level can go up very quickly. The most courteous neighbors inform others of get-togethers, and ask to let them know if the gathering has gotten too loud. Better yet, they invite all the neighbors to the party!

Take an active presence in change and community decisions.
Caring neighbors stay informed on community issues and make it a point to vote. It’s likely that you and your neighbors have busy lives and schedules, but if the community comes together as a group, change can happen more efficiently, and issues can be resolved more quickly. Plus, just showing up at community meetings and offering input shows that they care about the community and the people who share it.

Show respect.
Good neighbors teach their kids what both literal and figurative boundaries mean by explaining where their property ends and the neighbor’s begins, and any rules that go along with that. They also reinforce the concept that being on one side of the property line doesn’t mean noise levels can be ignored.

Know how to bring people together.
If their community doesn’t already have a method of sharing news, good neighbors would start a neighborhood e-mail list as a means of staying in communication with all of the neighbors in one fell swoop; and the best part is, once it is started, they don’t have to be the only one who keeps the momentum going. Any participating neighbor can spread the word about news, events, crimes, special garbage pickups, special event parking restrictions, weather hazards, school closings, and even the awesome weekly deal at the local market.

Eventually, the positive energy that these good neighbors spread will create a ripple effect of random acts of kindness and make the community a happier place to live. The next time new neighbors move in, consider welcoming the newcomers with a friendly hello and some local insider tips to quickly become the favorite neighbor on the block. Or choose from our collection of bright and cheerful neighborly greetings for anytime-gratitude that really stands out.

If you are thinking of buying or selling, talk to a real estate professional – talk to a REALTOR® who can give you the information you need to make an informed decision.

As always, if I can help with any of your real estate needs, please feel free to text or call me at 301-712-8808 or email me at RolandLow1@gmail.com.

Roland

PLEASE VISIT AND SHARE MY BLOGS AT
WWW.ROLANDLOW.WORDPRESS.COM
WWW.ALWAYSWANTEDTOKNOW.WORDPRESS.COM
WWW.SPIRITUALCHALLENGES.WORDPRESS.COM
WWW.SPIRITUALCHALLENGES.WORDPRESS.COM

Homebuying Tips for Military Families


Home Buying Tips for Military Families

Among the many changes that joining the military brings, a frequent change in location is sometimes part of the territory. For families, moving often can make it difficult to feel settled in a home, or to even make the commitment associated with homebuying.
But if you’ve made the decision to buy a home, you deserve to feel confident in your choice. These tips can help!

Consider the likelihood of selling.
One of the most important things to keep in mind is that, because of the risk of deployment, you may not be in your new house for long. While some families will stay in a house for over thirty years, this prospect isn’t as likely for active military members.
While searching for a house, look for points that can influence selling price down the line. Is the house in a good school district? Are there modern appliances? Are there any structural issues? These are all qualifications you would want to look at anyway, but are particularly important if you’ll eventually need to sell.

Get familiar with the neighborhood.
If you will be away from your family for long periods of time, you’ll want to make sure the neighborhood is warm and welcoming, and a place that the rest of your family will feel supported by while you’re gone.
Looking for a home near base could be beneficial in that there will probably be other military families nearby that you will be able to relate to and rely on. Some communities even offer special resources through programs like Joining Community Forces, which brings local businesses and services together in support of military families.

Use your resources.
There are a number of special resources available to military families interested in buying a home. VA loans, while not always feasible, can be extremely beneficial when used properly. A real estate agent familiar with the system can help military homebuyers work through the VA’s requirements process.
You will have to work with a VA appraiser, and not all homes meet the VA loan requirements, but it is absolutely worth it to look into and understand the resources available to you as a service member.

Ask around.
This is especially important if this will be your first homebuying experience, but it’s always beneficial to talk to families who have been through the process before. If you know of anyone who has bought a home previously, using a VA loan or other type of military assistance, ask them about their experience. What did they do right? What do they wish they did different?
Previous homebuyers can be a wealth of knowledge and guide you through your own journey, helping you avoid pitfalls and make decisions that will benefit you greatly down the road.

REALTOR®
Find a REALTOR® that you are comfortable with and that knows the market and the military life. Be careful of advertising companies who claim to serve military families. Their business strategy is for sales, not necessarily what is best for military families.

If you are thinking of buying or selling, talk to a real estate professional – talk to a REALTOR® who can give you the information you need to make an informed decision.

As always, if I can help with any of your real estate needs, please feel free to text or call me at 301-712-8808 or email me at RolandLow1@gmail.com.

Roland

PLEASE VISIT AND SHARE MY BLOGS AT
WWW.ROLANDLOW.WORDPRESS.COM
WWW.ALWAYSWANTEDTOKNOW.WORDPRESS.COM
WWW.SPIRITUALCHALLENGES.WORDPRESS.COM

Whether you are a first time home buyer, moving up, scaling down or an investor in real estate, this blog has something for you!

%d bloggers like this: